Messin With The Music Part 5 – Novocaine For The Soul

Greetings. We’re back with another tune to be messed with. This time we’re honoring ‘Novocaine For The Soul’ by Eels. This was a fun song to work with. I really enjoy the anthemic, sing along nature of the song. Again, we stayed basically acoustic except for the bass guitar. The song has 12 string guitar, bass, mandolin, six string banjo and a little percussion with tambourine and egg shaker.

To give a wider, stereo feel the 12 string guitar foundation track was played twice and panned hard stereo left and right. I think giving a track a wide stereo sound is important and playing a duplicate instrument track is a great way to do it. The two tracks can be very similar, but will almost never be identical (unless you force that with computer manipulation) so you hear each track distinctly from each channel. We worked the same concept with the vocal tracks, recording the main vocal twice and adding two harmony tracks.

Another thing that made this song interesting was the key. We don’t usually change the song from the original key. Specific keys do give songs a certain feel. Major key versus minor key or in this case having the song in D flat instead of D. In the original song they did this by using capos on the guitars. We ended up down tuning the 12 string guitar a half note and transposing the chords so the guitar could be played in first position for a fuller, richer sound. A capo was used on the 6 string banjo. We also added a second mandolin track that acts as a ‘voice’, along the lines of playing a guitar lead.

We may not have said this before, but all the Messin’ songs are played by Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs. You can find these songs and the band’s original music on our SoundCloud account (we have links on this site). We’re also slowly adding all the band’s songs to our YouTube channel (here’s a link to our YouTube channel): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0vVN4p_KzvLg1DEuUSJoqw

This is the season for sharing. So please share our songs and videos with your friends. Add them to your Facebook feeds. Become a follower of our blog. Email us with questions or comments. We really appreciate your support.

In The Studio – Episode 8

Welcome to Episode 8 in the ‘In The Studio’ series. Today’s topic is how to create mixing options for yourself during the recording process. A couple things to add about the process in the video. In the video the guitar sounds you hear have not been EQ’d on the mixing board. You can magnify the differences in sound by tweaking the EQ on each microphone using the mixing board. You can also add more diversity by adding effects units in the line between the guitar and amp (this will make more sense after you watch the video). As always if you have any questions or ideas, let us know.

An Evening With Reverend Peyton

Finally. Thursday night at the Sellersville Theater I got to see Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band. We’ve done several posts on them, first back around 2010 when ‘The Wages’ album came out. It’s been a long wait for a live show that I could get to. Summation of the show: great music, great performance, non-stop energy, absolutely worth the wait and I’d go see them again if they were back tomorrow. Crazy full live sound for a band with only one melodic instrument. This is the type of music I’ve really fallen in love with. Rev Peyton’s set up is simple – a guitar goes to an amp. No pedals, or extra electronics added. He plays mostly vintage guitars. Then you add Breezy Peyton on the washboard and Max Senteney on a small drum kit and make an amazingly full sound. They added a little more at the end of the show by having opening act J.D. Wilkes join them on butt kicking harmonica.

And they’re the kind of act you have to see live, especially at a more intimate venue. Loads of fun and personality. Audience participation requested and required. Non stop energy throughout the show. A good time is had by all. Stripping away instrumentation and effects makes it feel raw. It’s the total opposite of computer perfect songs and for me that makes the music feel alive. Blues you can head bang to. The Rev goes though multiple guitars from vintage resonators to three string cigar box, often switching guitars during songs.

Some photos:

I don’t really do phone videos when I’m at shows. I’m adding a couple of live videos that have much better quality than I would get. They’re two songs I really like, ‘Clap Your Hands’ and ‘Front Porch Trained’.

If you ever have the opportunity to see Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band live, grab a ticket when you can. You won’t be disappointed. I’d also say if you find a band you love, support them. Go to the shows, buy some CDs and merch (the Rev has some cool T-shirts). This band plays about 250 shows a year without a big label record contract. And puts out total energy each show. This is the kind of band that deserves support.

November Grapevine

I’m finding that sometimes the monthly grapevine songs fall in to a similar theme or style. I don’t know if it’s due to the mood I’m in, the weather, or just sheer luck. That seems to have happened this month. Or it could be my imagination………..or the voices……….ummmmmmm…… sorry got off track there (feel free to comment on similarities you see). Anyway, off we go…

First Up:

Saron Van Etten – ‘Memorial Day’

Nothing cheers me up more on a cold, rainy day than a good drone. Yes, I’m serious. I like the simple drums. The drone buzz here is carried by the fuzzed out bass. The keyboards have their own repeating rifts with a nice piece of droning noise in the background. The vocals play off of this, floating on top. And you get to see how it’s generated live. Always cool to visually see how parts go together. Putting all the relatively simple pieces together in their own little orbits makes the sound mesmerizing.

Next up:

The Willows – ‘False Light’

I liked the mix of sounds on this one. It’s built on a ‘folk’ feel. But it has the electric guitar layering in the background with a lot of sustain and reverb as well as a more standard drum kit. Although not truly a ‘live’ video, you do get shots of matched performance footage so you can see what/how people are playing. I like the banjo player playing it more like a guitar with a regular guitar pick style. Banjo is often thought of only in terms of bluegrass and it’s interesting seeing it put to different use.

Finally:

Baskery – ‘Wanna Tattoo’

So we have another video of what I call ‘matched performance’ playing along to the recorded song. I really liked the song when I first heard it. I’ve been in to good ol’ swampy blues music from Creedence Clearwater Revival, though The Gun Club and The Immortal Lee County Killers. So this simple, buzzy thump caught my ear. Then I saw this video. Now it’s even more fun. Fuzz on the double bass! Floor pedaled kick and snare! A six string banjo with distortion and slide (while playing the foot drums)! Recording wise, just enough reverb on the vocals and all the instruments are crystal clear. Now that’s a party.

Adding some retro:

Echo And The Bunnymen – ‘All That Jazz’

Sometimes I’m listening to an album I’ve heard a million times before and I have that little flashback of why I loved it in the first place and why it still sounds great. This song is from Echo And The Bunnymen’s first album ‘Crocodiles’. Starting with simple riffed bass and drums with vocals, it explodes in to heavily trebled guitar, drops back down and starts all over again. The vocals match the intensity of the parts being played. I did a lot of recording where I was working for that whip crack snare sound. Even the bass has a good amount of attack on it. All the components have their own clear space in the mix. This album will never grow old for me.

Messin’ With The Music Part 4 – Ballroom Blitz

So it’s time to throw another tune on the fire. We kept the same setup for this endeavor: same mic through the same pre-amp and compressor right in to the board – do the tracks straight through. To do what we wanted to with this song, we did add a few more tracks. So as you listen you’ll hear: 12 string guitar, 2 mandolin tracks, six string banjo (‘banjitar’ if you must), 5 string banjo, bass, washboard, tambourine, and cajon. We wanted to keep the fun feel so we tracked a bunch of vocals.

Soooooo………what does that give you? Our version of ‘Ballroom Blitz’ by The Sweet. I always thought the idea of Glam was over the top fun. Absolutely, wonderfully ridiculous. (If by some weird space/time issue you haven’t heard the original you must check it out). Hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed making it.

You can listen here on SoundCloud too:

In the Studio – Episode 7

Currently, in the studio, we are “messin’ with the music”… essentially taking songs we know, like, or think we can do in a unique way and most of all, having fun. While we do write originals, and have several in the pipeline, we like doing this as a source of creativity with a little less pressure (at least in our minds). We have some songs that we have messed with and are looking to get those up soon. Well, we won’t waste your time outlining what is in the video, take a look, and as usual, if you like it give it a thumbs up and subscribe. Drop us a line if you want to see more!

October Grapevine

Grapevine will be a new feature we’re going to try to do on a monthly basis. It will contain info about things we come across and would like to share with our readers. Most times, it will feature bands or songs that make an impression on us. Some will be new, some may be old but we’ve just found them. We don’t do reviews. These are songs (or some other media) that we like and why we like them. It may be the recording, the song style or feel, the instrumentation, arrangement or the attitude. We may also look at videos, photos or whatever excites us at the time. Who knows how it will evolve?

First Up:

Spielbergs – ‘Five On It’

Great recording, sounds kind of lo-fi style, but with all the instruments a clear part of the mix. Vocals are mixed in low enough that they have an instrumental feel, another instrument in the mix. The kind of songs I listen to cruising around backroads with the windows open singing along. Love the guitar crunch. This song is from the album ‘This Is The End’ and hearing the whole album straight through is a great listen. Some songs add a little shoegaze feedback guitar to the mix.

Second;

 Strand of Oaks – ‘Weird Ways’

The songs starts with vocal and just some background guitar. Really makes you listen to the lyrics. Excellent clear vocal sound. When the band kicks in the song goes up a notch without losing the vocals. Really like the clean drum sound. The song structure works with the interlude in the middle and the kick back in to the song. Super headphone music.

I’m adding a second song from the same album ‘Eraserland’. If for no other reason – the sonics of the slide guitar. Why do I so love melancholy?

Finally:

The Devil Makes Three – ‘Chains Are Broken’

My reason for this song is pretty obvious. Live. In. The. Studio. Acoustic. Does it get any better than that? So simple, so beautiful. If you can pull someone in using that format, you got it going. This version sounds a bit darker (and I do love darker) than the album version that has drums and more production. Second guitar part bites a little better on the studio version. Pretty cool that it kicks in both versions.

Hey, if you like this too, let us know.

Inspiration Point

The idea of an ‘Inspiration Point’ always reminds me of standing on the edge of a canyon and looking down at the beautiful scenery below. Or shouting in to the canyon and hearing an echo come back. Here’s an In The Studio version of our indoor inspiration point (Episode 6):

We also have three new ‘Messin’ With The Music’ songs in production and hope to have something out soon.

Messin’ With The Music Part 3 – Death Party

Time for another addition of ‘Messin With The Music’. Last post we spoke of our love for dark, swampy ‘Southern Gothic’ styles of music. So as we were thinking of what to ‘mess with’ next I naturally thought of one of our all time favorite bands, The Gun Club. We’ve visited them before – you can find our cover of ‘Ghost On The Highway’ on our SoundCloud site. The recording of this one has followed our same Messin’ philosophy – minimal takes, minimal mics, recording tracks straight through. The difference was this song was begging for electric guitar, lots of crunchy distortion and tons of reverb. We kept it minimal with bass, hand percussion and vocals (you’ll also hear a howlin’ surprise visit from Bonnie and Samantha).

We’re already working on the next tune in the series and it’s another bit of a sharp turn. For now, turn down the lights, crank up the volume and enjoy The Gun Club’s ‘Death Party’.