Category: Video

Good reads and good tunes

I stumbled across this song from a book I read called Stillhouse Lake, by Rachel Caine – good read and the music she lists at the end is awesome.  So check it out.

This is one of the titles I particularly liked – and of course, the lyrics are way cool – the beat is catchy.

Lo Fidelity All Stars – Battleflag (came out around 2008, um, where have I been?)

So on to serious business… I have a great surprise coming out next week from the studio.  Got to work with a really great guy and had a great time recording with him.

Until next week, hit play and turn it up!

Advertisements

Ride The Pink Noise

We recently changed the placement set up for monitoring with our Yamaha NS10M Studio monitors. They were placed further away from the listening point and sound panels were placed at equal distances beside and behind the monitors. The idea was to get a wider stereo feel and to equalize the reflection surfaces around the speakers.

081

We do use other monitors during the mixing process but I like using the Yamahas for the initial mixing. For quite a while you couldn’t see a picture of a recording studio without seeing a pair of NS10s by the mixing console. Some people love them and some hate them. I like them but you have to know their strengths and weaknesses and use them accordingly. If you’re interested in more of their history, here’s an article from Sound On Sound that has a good discussion of their background:

http://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/yamaha-ns10-story

Since the placement was changed, that meant it was time to redo the room tuning for them. Ahhhh yes, the joy of a night of listening to pink noise. So I broke out the real time analyzer and got to work. Make sure that the mic for the analyzer is positioned in the spot where you’ll be sitting – near field monitors have a tight listening field and accuracy matters. The sound from pink noise will fluctuate, so you have to study the levels while it is running then review the peak capture when you turn it off. Here’s the running sound and peak capture when the EQ going in to the monitors is flat:

077

074

NS10Ms tend to be weak at the low end, so the EQ is adjusted accordingly. The process takes a while since when you adjust one frequency it effects the frequencies around it. The final EQ setting looks like this:

078

Here’s the running sound afterwards (remember running sound fluctuates, so a snap shot at a particular time will not look flat):

076

The final shot of the peak captures gives a good representation of where we ended up:

079

I’m pretty comfortable with the flatter EQ at the end of the process. One other tip is to make sure you are hearing equal levels from both speakers so you don’t overload one side when you’re mixing. The real time analyzer should let you get actual equal volumes for both sides. I have some volume hearing loss in one ear – the result of playing in bands for a lot of years (fortunately it is not frequency loss). To check on this take one channel of the song you’re mixing and run it straight down the center of your stereo field while sitting in your perfect center listening spot. If it sounds like it’s coming more from one channel or the other, make the adjustment on the volume of your reference amp. It’s at the end of the sound chain so it equalizes volume for your ears without effecting the balance in your actual mix. I also check the final mix of songs through the Real Time Analyzer so I’m using sight as well as sound to get the frequencies where I want them.

After the NS10 mixing is completed we’ll make any mix adjustments and also do the mastering through the higher end monitors set up in a different listening station. It’s always important to take your time, ‘put the mix down’ and come back to it later for review to get the best results possible. A great song will shine through no matter what, but a great mix will always improve your song.

And because I like to leave a little music for you……..

Father John Misty – “Ballad of The Dying Man”

 

The Record Company – Give It Back To You

Might be a little late for this train, BUT…

This is off their above-titled release, but I gotta say the whole CD is good listening. CD photography is cool and the design was done by the drummer Marc Cazorla and the mix was done by the bassist Alex Stiff. Hard work, good rewards. So on that note (see what I did there?)… you can laugh now. Turn it up, I dare you not to start bobbing your head- seriously.

More Kudos:
Segar – the pup and well, yeah because animals rock.
TRC Studios – Alex Stiff
Concord Music Group – Paul Blakemore

Speaking Of Vocals Follow Up

After I finished writing the last post I sat down to read through it and listened to ‘Heroes’ again. And again. Beyond the beauty of the song itself I was intrigued by a lot of the recording technique in it. I did a little searching on the internet and came across an article on the recording of ‘Heroes’ in Sound On Sound where they cover the recording of different ‘classic’ tracks. I really recommend reading the entire article. It’s not just nuts and bolts tech info; they cover the production of the song and how the recording ideas came about. I won’t rehash the whole article as I’ve attached a link to it. But since we were speaking of vocals the info on them was pretty amazing. The entire vocal part was written and recorded in five hours. The main vocal was recorded on a single track in one take (with a few splice ins here and there). For the main vocal there were three mics: one close, one about 15 feet away and a third at the other end of the very large room they were recording in. The close mic had heavy compression; the other two mics were gated and only opened up as the volume hit a certain level. As the vocal gets louder another mic in the room would open. So towards the end when the vocals are almost ‘shouted’ all three mics have opened up and all the reverb is natural from the room – and all three mics were recorded to the same track. Truly Amazing. Genius always finds a way.

Also check out how Robert Fripp got those high guitar feedback parts (they almost sound like a synth) by measuring the distance he stood from the amp to get the perfect feedback sound on each individual note.

Here’s the link to the Sound On Sound article:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/oct04/articles/classictracks.htm

Here’s another link to ‘Heroes’ sound you don’t have to go back to the last post to hear it:

 

The Polyphonic Spree

Recently I discovered the Dallas-based band (yes I know they have been around a long time – the rock that I lived under didn’t have wi-fi), The Polyphonic Spree. So, I decided to put up a post about them and say that I apologize for being so lame with getting around to posting, but it has been a trying last 6 months or so. Things are starting to turn around now and I figured this would be a good segue to putting something up about the band and saying that I am looking forward to getting back into the schedule of posting with more frequency. Cheers!

Uptown Funk – Mark Ronson

OK, so I was gonna post this like 3 weeks ago and just never got around to it. I heard this and really feel like it took all the great stuff from several funk songs and mashed ’em all into one song. Bruno Mars is a great front person for the video as well as the song – and most of all – it just looks fun.
So, as the song says, “Don’t believe me just watch…”

And in case you wanna see it live…

Strings For Spring

Well, spring isn’t here yet (at least in the northeast) but the sun was out today, it was over 40 degrees (whoooo) and daylight savings time has begun. All in all as close to nice weather as it’s been around here for quite some time. Spring turns a young persons fancy to…….acoustic instruments (it also helps bring some of us out of hibernation). Over the winter months we’ve been collecting instruments for the studio to add some variety to our in house recording. Pictured below are some of the items we picked up.

Acoustic Instruments 001

Not that we’ll use everything in a traditional manner. The options are limitless. As are the variety of ways you can mic, amplify or record acoustic instruments. Here’s a video with some ideas for recording banjo.

You can count on us breaking the rules whenever possible (hhmmmm – phase shifter on mandolin?). So much to look forward to.
To add to the acoustic flavor, here’s a video of Trampled By Turtles live on NPR. Can’t you just feel spring in the sound?

Hope the weather heads to spring where ever you are.

Time Flies……..and crashes

Yes, as the saying goes, time flies when you’re having fun. Well, time flies even when you’re not having fun. I’m not much of a winter person so it’s been a while between posts. So I think it’s time for another round of ‘what do these things have in common’. First let’s talk some music, old school style. When writing or recording you can get away with a lot if you concentrate first on the rhythm. I came across an article that deals with the pinnacle of old school rhythm. If you want to know how to construct a groove you can’t lose if you study James Brown. Here’s an interview article with Clyde Stubblefield the original ‘Funky Drummer’. It’s an interesting read (or listen):

http://www.npr.org/2015/01/05/374818384/the-original-funky-drummers-on-life-with-james-brown

How about a clip where Stubblefield gives a live demonstration of how the beat originates:

And now hearing the beat in a bigger context:

You could put a political speech on top of that and it would still be funky.

So what else is new? Velvet Wrinkle Wreckerds and ERP have new T-shirts!

http://www.velvetwrinklewreckerds.com/?page_id=8

What do these things have in common? Ummmmmm…..does it really matter? Not really!
– Happy Winter –

Something Borrowed

I stumbled across these guys on YouTube and I watched just about every cover video I could find. I love how these were taken and re-molded into another genre – and done well. I try to embrace many different musical influences and this one just fit the bill. I also loved the instrumentation and the harmonies are pretty darn tight.

In other news, we have a lot of music we are working on in the studio and are getting ready to throw some new stuff out on SoundCloud – when that happens, I will of course, shout it out here.

Without further ado:

If the previous didn’t do it for you, try this one:

A Good Place To Start

Well, I’ve certainly been AWOL the last couple of months. A lot has been going on, some good, some bad, some blah, blah, blah. Thought I’d throw a couple of things up for you to peruse.
First, for anyone who is interested in starting out in recording music there’s a site that shows you the basics of mixing and listening….and you get to play around with Peter Gabriel’s music..and post your own mixes in SoundCloud. I’ve only touched some of the basic parts (pretty hard to pull my butt out of my own studio) but what I’ve seen is pretty interesting.

http://www.playwithyourmusic.org/

On another note, recently spent a night with the legendary Reverend Horton Heat. Totally ass-kicking (and I so want that guitar). Here’s a live video for your enjoyment. Hope to post some pictures from the show soon.