Category: CHP Studio

In The Studio Ep 11 – ChurchHouse Studio Tour

It’s been a while since we did an In The Studio episode. We had some live performance ideas started, but as with much of our lives, that’s temporarily on hold. So I thought we might do some more episodes that simplify studio tech as we did with micing the snare drum. A good place to start would be with a quick overview of the studio. You’ll have to excuse some of the noise in the video – it’s literally live with me picking up the camera and moving around, no post recording editing. You know us – we love running it ‘live’. If you have any questions, comments or topics you’d like to see discussed in future episodes, let us know. So let’s get started……….

Below are some photos referenced in the video. This will give you an idea of how the main control room setup is changeable depending on the task. First two photos are of different mixing/mastering station setups.

Mixing/Mastering Setup 1
Mixing/Mastering Setup 2

A couple of photos of setups using the movable sound panels – Vocal booth and amp separation.

Vocal Booth
Amp Separation

And finally a couple of photos of setups in the big room. All the mic signal goes back to the main control room in to the patch bay shown in the video.

Drum recording session
Full band session

Messin With The Music Part 9 – Seven Nation Army

We’re back with another ‘messed’ song for your enjoyment. There’s a bit of a story with this one. ‘Seven Nation Army’ was actually recorded before most of the other songs that have been posted. Recording these covers did start with one idea we have maintained with all the songs – recording the tracks straight through to keep it having a more ‘live’ feel. With this song we did what we often do with our own studio songs – record multiple tracks of each instrument for a more ‘full’ sound. So most of the instruments on ‘Seven Nation Army’ were tracked several times (although each separate track is recorded straight through). We also used multiple mics on the acoustic instruments, adding even more tracks.

This tune has twelve string guitar, mandolin, banjo and six string guitar. The percussion is the floor tom from our drum kit and a shaker. Each instrument was tracked several times (except the percussion). Two more mandolin parts were added in the one instrumental section as a ‘lead’ instrument. When we finished recording I realized it would take a while to mix correctly so we decided to record another song without all the multi tracking and multiple mics. And when we finished that song we thought of another, then another……… So it took quite a while to get back to mixing ‘Seven Nation Army’.

As we continue messin’ with songs I’m sure more electric instrumentation while come in to play along with a bunch of other ideas. As always, hit us up with comments and questions if you have any. Hope you enjoy.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs play The White Stripes ‘Seven Nation Army’:

Messin With The Music Part 8 – Everything That Rises Must Converge

We’re back with another messed with tune for you. This song is from the band Shriekback from the 1985 album ‘Oil And Gold’. They were another early influence band for me. What first drew me in were the great funky bass parts from Dave Allen, formally bass player for Gang Of Four. They also do some wonderfully spooky atmospheric songs with very spare instrumentation. I’d suggest listening through the whole Oil And Gold album if you have the chance.

Another part that draws me in comes from the song title. The concept was first put forth by French philosopher and Jesuit priest Pierre Teilhard de Chardin who felt there could be common ground between philosophy, science and religion. It’s a concept we could really use in these times. To quote de Chradin: “Remain true to yourself, but move ever upward toward greater consciousness and greater love! At the summit you will find yourselves united with all those who, from every direction, have made the same ascent. For everything that rises must converge.”

Finally from a technical standpoint, the Messin ‘live feel’ protocols remain. The song centers on the bass line (including the challenge of playing it straight through the entire song) and the vocals. We have two vocal tracks that sometimes combine and sometimes harmonize. Bubbling in the background is banjo, mandolin, six string guitar and twelve string guitar. We added some shaker and a percussive combination of a mini tambourine combined with washboard (you’ll hear it best right at the end of the song). This was another recording in which stereo placement of each instrument was very important to the final sound. Listen carefully and you should be able to find all the pieces.

As always, hope you enjoy it and questions and comments are welcome. It’s a little tougher with all of us having to work remotely from each other. Please stay safe in these difficult times.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs play ‘Everything That Rises Must Converge’

In The Studio Ep 10 – Recording Snare Drums And Phase Cancellation

As you scroll through the internet you’ll find lots of videos, blogs, web sites, etc that present info on studio recording. There are a lot of great ones, some very high end studios and some very experienced, knowledgeable people. I’ve watched and read a lot of them myself. So I sat down and gave some thought as to what our place in this vast info universe would be. I’d like our videos and info to make you feel comfortable and at home. As if one of our friends walked in and asked “I always wondered how you……….”. That’s why we do mostly single take videos and record ‘live set up’ songs whenever possible.

This video gives some basic tips on recording the snare drum and the concept of phase cancellation. As you watch the video keep in mind that phase cancellation can happen with anything you record. It’s something to always keep in mind as you do mic placement or mixing. Keep your ears open and your eyes on your sound waves. And always follow the first rule – experiment, try different set ups and compare.

If you have any “I’ve always wondered…..” questions or situations, feel free to leave a comment/question or send us an email. We’re always up for a good ‘conversation’.

In The Studio Ep 9 – Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs ‘Born Again’

For a while now we’ve been thinking of how to do ‘live’ videos for Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs. We do practice the songs live with just vocals and acoustic guitar. But that doesn’t always give the essence of the song as it was written since many of the songs are the result of several small ‘riffs’ put together on different instruments. So we decided to record some parts of the song and then play along live with the pre-recorded parts. We still do the pre-recorded parts as ‘live’ tracks by playing them straight through in ‘Messin’ With The Music’ fashion. This allows us to video the live playing while still getting the real feel of the song.

The first song we’ve recorded is ‘Born Again’ which is on the album ‘Superior Olive’ we did as Conduit. The pre-recorded parts are acoustic guitar, banjo, snare drum and the bass beat on a cajon. The electric guitar in the video goes through a few effects pedals to an amp in another room using one microphone. The vocals are recorded with the mic seen in the video (also pushed the tube drive on the vocals to get a little ‘grit’). We’ve kept the unedited live feel, even the shots of walking back and forth to turn the video recorder on and off. We had a good time with this, so expect more performance videos in the future.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs – ‘Born Again’

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs – ‘Born Again’

Messin With The Music Part 6 – Jeepster

Welcome to 2020. When this song was written that date was the realm of science fiction. We’d be living on other planets, have flying cars and could teleport. Yeah, well. T. Rex released Jeepster at the end of 1971. The song’s chords and structure are basically ‘blues’ oriented. But throw in a few pounds of ‘glam’ and the song turns more psychedelic. Songs from that era are just so much fun to mess with. I think it’s how ‘loose’ they are. If you listen to the original there’s a drum beat intro, which starts at about 88 bpm. By the time we’re rolling in the first verse, it’s at about 95 bpm and it fluctuates throughout the song. It gives the song personality and makes it feel alive.

We stuck with the Messin’ recording rules to keep the live feel. The overall idea was to have the instruments doing intersecting ‘riffs’ with the vocals sort of floating on top. So instrumentally we have: six string banjo to carry the main riff, played twice for the stereo effect; twelve string guitar; two mandolin parts; fretless bass; five string banjo for fills and acoustic slide guitar. We have two different tracks for the vocal. One vocal track was spawned by our discussion of working on a Prince song in the future (‘how would Prince sing Jeepster?’) So instead of one vocal track being the ‘main’ track, we blended two together. More tracks also allowed better options to pan the tracks for stereo which allows you to hear the separate parts easier (and it’s fun for headphones).

So here’s Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs covering T.Rex’s ‘Jeepster’.

Messin With The Music Part 5 – Novocaine For The Soul

Greetings. We’re back with another tune to be messed with. This time we’re honoring ‘Novocaine For The Soul’ by Eels. This was a fun song to work with. I really enjoy the anthemic, sing along nature of the song. Again, we stayed basically acoustic except for the bass guitar. The song has 12 string guitar, bass, mandolin, six string banjo and a little percussion with tambourine and egg shaker.

To give a wider, stereo feel the 12 string guitar foundation track was played twice and panned hard stereo left and right. I think giving a track a wide stereo sound is important and playing a duplicate instrument track is a great way to do it. The two tracks can be very similar, but will almost never be identical (unless you force that with computer manipulation) so you hear each track distinctly from each channel. We worked the same concept with the vocal tracks, recording the main vocal twice and adding two harmony tracks.

Another thing that made this song interesting was the key. We don’t usually change the song from the original key. Specific keys do give songs a certain feel. Major key versus minor key or in this case having the song in D flat instead of D. In the original song they did this by using capos on the guitars. We ended up down tuning the 12 string guitar a half note and transposing the chords so the guitar could be played in first position for a fuller, richer sound. A capo was used on the 6 string banjo. We also added a second mandolin track that acts as a ‘voice’, along the lines of playing a guitar lead.

We may not have said this before, but all the Messin’ songs are played by Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs. You can find these songs and the band’s original music on our SoundCloud account (we have links on this site). We’re also slowly adding all the band’s songs to our YouTube channel (here’s a link to our YouTube channel): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0vVN4p_KzvLg1DEuUSJoqw

This is the season for sharing. So please share our songs and videos with your friends. Add them to your Facebook feeds. Become a follower of our blog. Email us with questions or comments. We really appreciate your support.

In The Studio – Episode 8

Welcome to Episode 8 in the ‘In The Studio’ series. Today’s topic is how to create mixing options for yourself during the recording process. A couple things to add about the process in the video. In the video the guitar sounds you hear have not been EQ’d on the mixing board. You can magnify the differences in sound by tweaking the EQ on each microphone using the mixing board. You can also add more diversity by adding effects units in the line between the guitar and amp (this will make more sense after you watch the video). As always if you have any questions or ideas, let us know.

Messin’ With The Music Part 4 – Ballroom Blitz

So it’s time to throw another tune on the fire. We kept the same setup for this endeavor: same mic through the same pre-amp and compressor right in to the board – do the tracks straight through. To do what we wanted to with this song, we did add a few more tracks. So as you listen you’ll hear: 12 string guitar, 2 mandolin tracks, six string banjo (‘banjitar’ if you must), 5 string banjo, bass, washboard, tambourine, and cajon. We wanted to keep the fun feel so we tracked a bunch of vocals.

Soooooo………what does that give you? Our version of ‘Ballroom Blitz’ by The Sweet. I always thought the idea of Glam was over the top fun. Absolutely, wonderfully ridiculous. (If by some weird space/time issue you haven’t heard the original you must check it out). Hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed making it.

You can listen here on SoundCloud too:

Inspiration Point

The idea of an ‘Inspiration Point’ always reminds me of standing on the edge of a canyon and looking down at the beautiful scenery below. Or shouting in to the canyon and hearing an echo come back. Here’s an In The Studio version of our indoor inspiration point (Episode 6):

We also have three new ‘Messin’ With The Music’ songs in production and hope to have something out soon.