Tagged: Recording Drums

New Episode of In the Studio and more studio news~

It has been a hectic month – allow me to es-plain.  My personal computer (not the studio computer) had a hard drive failure and I had to order, install, etc.  a new hard drive and get it up and running which is now done, thus the long silence on the blog.  Ugh (insert long exhausted sigh here).  The computer is dead – long live the computer.

We put up another episode of In the Studio and also uploaded some other listening pleasure on the YouTube channel from ERP (Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs) and in the next month will have some music from other artists featured there as well. We have recently been filming footage for another music video due to be released hopefully by the end of the summer. In addition, we have been updating the merchandise store (more on that to come) and have added some new items.

Last but not least – we are working a complete re-do of the label site and will no doubt make some additions to the studio site and when we do, we will of course let you know!  Enjoy.

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So Many Choices………

When you begin to work on recording in your personal or project studio, what do you think is the most difficult instrument to record? All instruments (including voice) have their challenges. I think many people have found that recording live drums presented the greatest challenge. There are so many microphones, placements and techniques that it can seem a bit overwhelming at first. As with many parts of the recording process, there is not necessarily one correct way to record. You can use two room mics or multiple room and direct mics. As the recording capacity of ChurchHouse increased, I’ve used as many as thirteen mics to get the sound I want. I don’t necessarily use all the tracks in the final mix, but it’s nice to have options.
There’s a lot to consider. What type of mic is best for each piece of the kit? Where do want to place them? The drums need to be tuned correctly for recording, which will probably be different than tuning for a live show. Then there’s the ‘800 pound gorilla’ of the process – the room you record in. The room can make all the difference. In fact it can make THE difference. Some studios are known just for their drum rooms. We’re lucky enough to have both a small, ‘tight’ room that absorbs sound and a large open room with lots of natural reverb.

Small Room

Gretsch Drums 061705 005

Large Room

churchhouse drum recrd

I’ve included a few articles about basic drum recording that I thought were a pretty good starting point. The bottom line in recording drums is taking the time and experimenting to see what works best for your drum set, equipment and recording room.

http://www.musicradar.com/tuition/drums/13-correct-ways-to-mic-up-a-drum-kit-209119

http://indieambassador.com/articles/tech-how-to-properly-mic-a-drum-set