Tagged: Messin’ With The Music

Messin’ With The Music Part 16 – ‘Hash Pipe’

‘Hash Pipe’ was released in 2001 on Weezer’s third album titled ‘Weezer’ but usually referred to as ‘The Green Album’ (since they’ve used ‘Weezer’ as the title of several albums). I’ve always liked the straight forward, hit you on the head with a hammer nature of the main riff. When it came out I was also fascinated that it was a radio single considering the title and the nature of the lyrics. It’s interesting that when I went to the the official video to relearn the song the video now says ‘revised’ and they’ve totally cut out the lyric line in the song with the words ‘hash pipe’. Not bleeped out words – the musical line is totally removed! Ummmm- OK.

Part of the reason we do the cover songs is to work on the recording process and song arrangement so we can apply what we learn to our own songs. Song arrangement is a process people don’t usually consciously think about when they listen to music, but it’s a very important part of making any song have a distinct sound and feel. For instance in ‘Hash Pipe’ even though we used acoustic instruments and don’t have a drum kit to drive the beat, the acoustic version we did sounds a bit denser to me. That’s a result of using a variety of instruments playing more arpeggiated parts. So while the original may have more straight forward power drive, an acoustic version may sound softer but still a bit ‘thicker’. That’s all part of the learning process. This version has two six string acoustic guitars, a twelve string acoustic, banjo, bass, wood block, shaker and tambourine and several tracks of vocals. The lead riff is done with mandolin and a six string banjo.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs cover Weezer’s ‘Hash Pipe’:

Messin With The Music – Part 15 – ‘Lawyers, Guns And Money’

For Part 15 of our Messin’ With The Music’ series we decided to tackle ‘Lawyers’ Guns And Money’ by Warren Zevon. The song comes from Zevon’s 1978 album ‘Excitable Boy’. This was a huge album for Zevon and contained many of the songs people know from him – ‘Excitable Boy’, ‘Werewolves Of London’, ‘Roland The Headless Thompson Gunner’ as well as ‘Lawyers, Guns And Money’. There’s a lot of ways you can describe Zevon’s songwriting, but one part of his music that I always enjoy is the entertainment value of the lyrics. First, his vocal style makes the lyrics pretty easy to hear and understand. Many of the song lyrics are built as stories: some humor, some fun, some just out and out strange. He may be an acquired taste for some people, but you’ll absolutely recognize who it is when you hear them on the radio. Another cool thing about this album is the amazing amount of well known musicians who participated in the recording besides the ‘main band’: John McVie and Mick Fleetwood from Fleetwood Mac, Jackson Browne, Jeff Porcaro, Linda Ronstadt, J.D. Souther, Waddy Wachtel, Jennifer Warnes, Danny Kortchmar to name a few. Some of those names might not be as familiar, but if you look them up you’ll see how many well known songs and albums they’ve played on. Zevon was definitely a well respected musician among his peers.

For our version the main instrument holding down the song is a twelve string guitar. We recorded it twice and panned the tracks hard left and right. For these acoustic versions this is a common way we start the songs as it builds a good stereo field and makes the song sound full. If you had drums and electric guitars, they would usually handle that part of the recording. There is a six string guitar and a six string banjo. Besides the chords during the vocals, they play riffs in between the vocal parts, sort of mirroring the guitar that plays on the original song after the second verse. We also added mandolin and bass parts. There are duo vocals on this song – we actually sang both live in the same room at the same time. That was a lot of fun. We’d usually add some percussion, but with the banjo and guitar playing riffs, it seemed pretty full and more percussion wasn’t necessary.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs cover Warren Zevon’s ‘Lawyers, Guns and Money’:

Messin With The Music – Part 14 – Instant Karma!

We’re back with another tune from our Messin’ With The Music series. Instant Karma! (the exclamation point is officially part of the title) was released by John Lennon in 1970. This song came out at the same time The Beatles were working on Let It Be. One interesting fact about the song is that it was written, recorded and released within a period of ten days. That’s an incredibly quick turnaround, especially for an artist at that level of success. It’s always been my favorite Lennon solo single. The idea that karma, ‘you reap what you sow’, could happen instantaneously rather play out over the remaining course of your life is a very appealing idea. The power in Lennon’s vocal always felt like a big middle finger to every self centered person who screwed other people over. Karma, of course, works in both directions. I also find the idea that people who do good will receive good in return appealing. Personally I wouldn’t mind seeing instant karma doled out for much of what happened in 2020 (and continues to happen in 2021).

We kept with our usual Messin’ recording protocol using single mic straight through tracking. We did put in a pretty full roster of tracks for this song. The original was Phil Spector produced and used multiple piano takes for it’s basic feel. Spector was famous for his ‘wall of sound’ methodology and it shows in this recording. The original was also swimming in reverb to make it sound even bigger. For our base tracks we used finger picked acoustic guitars and recorded two separate tracks, panned hard left and right. There are two separate mandolin tracks, one using mostly chords and the other generally picking single notes. A third mandolin part plays a little riff in the instrumental break. We added a bass guitar track and a sparse single note oriented banjo track. Percussion tracks include tambourine, shaker, washboard and wood block. There’s a main vocal track with a harmony vocal floating underneath in the verses. We wanted a bigger sound in the chorus in keeping with the feel of the original so we have a main vocal and four other vocal tracks that are panned in hard stereo to give that bigger feel.

I really enjoyed finally being able to do a cover of this song. We hope you enjoy it too.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs play John Lennon’s ‘Instant Karma!’:

Messin With The Music Part 12 – Shout

For today’s post we’re Messin with another song for you. This time we’re taking on ‘Shout’ by Tears For Fears. The song first came out in 1984 on Tears For Fears second album, Songs From The Big Chair. It became one of the most popular and recognizable songs of that era of music. One of the best fist in the air, sing along choruses you’ll find. As I’ve said before we always pick songs we like to cover. I don’t think you can do an interesting cover unless you have some type of love for the song you’re working with. But you also have to be able to do something different and interesting with the tune. For ERP I don’t see the point of trying to do a note for note copy of a song. Who wants to do a ‘not as good’ exact copy of a song you love.

For ‘Shout’ it was easy to do something different. The song has a pretty ‘electronic’ sound to it, along with the drive from a full drum kit. So turning it acoustic gave it us a lot of choices. The basic foundation of the song was built on twelve string acoustic guitar. We did two tracks of that and panned them to opposite stereo channels. The other thing that gives these guitars some push and pull is that they are not completely identical throughout the song. If you’re wondering about how song arrangements are created, this technique is something to keep in mind. Before there were large multi track studios, you had to really think about how to place tracks in the song. If you listen to some Hendrix songs you’ll hear drums in one channel only and guitar or bass only in the opposite channel.

So for ‘Shout’ we used the two takes of twelve string guitar, mandolin, banjo and bass. There’s also some acoustic slide guitar and a second mandolin in the instrumental parts. For rhythm we used tambourine, washboard, wood block (the wood version of ‘More Cowbell’), egg shaker and a rattler that sounds a bit rain stick. We did four tracks of vocals, two for the verse and two for the chorus. The point is to highlight the vocals and lyrics. This was a one mic recording. We used the new ribbon mic for everything (see In The Studio – Microphone Basics). I’m pretty happy with the results.

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs cover ‘Shout’ by Tears For Fears:

Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs cover ‘Shout’ by Tears For Fears


Messin With The Music Part 6 – Jeepster

Welcome to 2020. When this song was written that date was the realm of science fiction. We’d be living on other planets, have flying cars and could teleport. Yeah, well. T. Rex released Jeepster at the end of 1971. The song’s chords and structure are basically ‘blues’ oriented. But throw in a few pounds of ‘glam’ and the song turns more psychedelic. Songs from that era are just so much fun to mess with. I think it’s how ‘loose’ they are. If you listen to the original there’s a drum beat intro, which starts at about 88 bpm. By the time we’re rolling in the first verse, it’s at about 95 bpm and it fluctuates throughout the song. It gives the song personality and makes it feel alive.

We stuck with the Messin’ recording rules to keep the live feel. The overall idea was to have the instruments doing intersecting ‘riffs’ with the vocals sort of floating on top. So instrumentally we have: six string banjo to carry the main riff, played twice for the stereo effect; twelve string guitar; two mandolin parts; fretless bass; five string banjo for fills and acoustic slide guitar. We have two different tracks for the vocal. One vocal track was spawned by our discussion of working on a Prince song in the future (‘how would Prince sing Jeepster?’) So instead of one vocal track being the ‘main’ track, we blended two together. More tracks also allowed better options to pan the tracks for stereo which allows you to hear the separate parts easier (and it’s fun for headphones).

So here’s Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs covering T.Rex’s ‘Jeepster’.

Messin With The Music Part 5 – Novocaine For The Soul

Greetings. We’re back with another tune to be messed with. This time we’re honoring ‘Novocaine For The Soul’ by Eels. This was a fun song to work with. I really enjoy the anthemic, sing along nature of the song. Again, we stayed basically acoustic except for the bass guitar. The song has 12 string guitar, bass, mandolin, six string banjo and a little percussion with tambourine and egg shaker.

To give a wider, stereo feel the 12 string guitar foundation track was played twice and panned hard stereo left and right. I think giving a track a wide stereo sound is important and playing a duplicate instrument track is a great way to do it. The two tracks can be very similar, but will almost never be identical (unless you force that with computer manipulation) so you hear each track distinctly from each channel. We worked the same concept with the vocal tracks, recording the main vocal twice and adding two harmony tracks.

Another thing that made this song interesting was the key. We don’t usually change the song from the original key. Specific keys do give songs a certain feel. Major key versus minor key or in this case having the song in D flat instead of D. In the original song they did this by using capos on the guitars. We ended up down tuning the 12 string guitar a half note and transposing the chords so the guitar could be played in first position for a fuller, richer sound. A capo was used on the 6 string banjo. We also added a second mandolin track that acts as a ‘voice’, along the lines of playing a guitar lead.

We may not have said this before, but all the Messin’ songs are played by Electrostatic Rhythm Pigs. You can find these songs and the band’s original music on our SoundCloud account (we have links on this site). We’re also slowly adding all the band’s songs to our YouTube channel (here’s a link to our YouTube channel): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0vVN4p_KzvLg1DEuUSJoqw

This is the season for sharing. So please share our songs and videos with your friends. Add them to your Facebook feeds. Become a follower of our blog. Email us with questions or comments. We really appreciate your support.

Messin’ With The Music Part 4 – Ballroom Blitz

So it’s time to throw another tune on the fire. We kept the same setup for this endeavor: same mic through the same pre-amp and compressor right in to the board – do the tracks straight through. To do what we wanted to with this song, we did add a few more tracks. So as you listen you’ll hear: 12 string guitar, 2 mandolin tracks, six string banjo (‘banjitar’ if you must), 5 string banjo, bass, washboard, tambourine, and cajon. We wanted to keep the fun feel so we tracked a bunch of vocals.

Soooooo………what does that give you? Our version of ‘Ballroom Blitz’ by The Sweet. I always thought the idea of Glam was over the top fun. Absolutely, wonderfully ridiculous. (If by some weird space/time issue you haven’t heard the original you must check it out). Hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed making it.

You can listen here on SoundCloud too:

In the Studio – Episode 7

Currently, in the studio, we are “messin’ with the music”… essentially taking songs we know, like, or think we can do in a unique way and most of all, having fun. While we do write originals, and have several in the pipeline, we like doing this as a source of creativity with a little less pressure (at least in our minds). We have some songs that we have messed with and are looking to get those up soon. Well, we won’t waste your time outlining what is in the video, take a look, and as usual, if you like it give it a thumbs up and subscribe. Drop us a line if you want to see more!

Messin’ With The Music Part 3 – Death Party

Time for another addition of ‘Messin With The Music’. Last post we spoke of our love for dark, swampy ‘Southern Gothic’ styles of music. So as we were thinking of what to ‘mess with’ next I naturally thought of one of our all time favorite bands, The Gun Club. We’ve visited them before – you can find our cover of ‘Ghost On The Highway’ on our SoundCloud site. The recording of this one has followed our same Messin’ philosophy – minimal takes, minimal mics, recording tracks straight through. The difference was this song was begging for electric guitar, lots of crunchy distortion and tons of reverb. We kept it minimal with bass, hand percussion and vocals (you’ll also hear a howlin’ surprise visit from Bonnie and Samantha).

We’re already working on the next tune in the series and it’s another bit of a sharp turn. For now, turn down the lights, crank up the volume and enjoy The Gun Club’s ‘Death Party’.